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NON COW’S MILK LINKED TO SHORTER HEIGHT

GETTING THE SHORT END?
10
Jun

NON COW’S MILK LINKED TO SHORTER HEIGHT

NON COW’S MILK LINKED TO SHORTER HEIGHT

Researchers have linked the consumption of non-cow’s milk with shorter height in children

INTERESTING ARTICLE, WHAT DO YOU THINK?

A new study of more than 5,000 children has associated consumption of non-cow’s milk with shorter height, raising concerns about the nutritional content of cow’s milk alternatives.

Researchers found that children who consume non-cow’s milk may be shorter than average for their age, compared with children who drink cow’s milk.

Furthermore, the study revealed that the greater children’s intake of non-cow’s milk, the shorter they are likely to be.

Lead study author Dr. Jonathon Maguire, of St. Michael’s Hospital in Canada, and colleagues recently reported their findings in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the advice is that cow’s milk should not be given to children under the age of 1 year, as it lacks many of the required nutrients. What is more, the protein and fat in cow’s milk is hard for babies to digest.

For children over the age of 1 year, however, cow’s milk is considered beneficial for the developing brain and bone health, due to its high content of fat, protein, and calcium.

Studies have also associated cow’s milk consumption in childhood with increased height. The new study supports this association, after finding that children who drink non-cow’s milk are likely to be shorter.

Each cup of non-cow’s milk linked to shorter height

Dr. Maguire and team came to their findings by analyzing the data of 5,034 children aged 24 to 72 months who were a part of the Canadian Applied Research Group for Kids cohort.

The researchers looked at each child’s daily intake of cow’s milk, as well as their daily intake of non-cow’s milk, such as soy milk and almond milk.

Cow’s milk was consumed on a daily basis by 92 percent of the children, while 13 percent of the children drank non-cow’s milk every day.

Compared with children who consumed cow’s milk, those who drank non-cow’s milk were shorter than average for their age; for every 250-milliliter cup of non-cow’s milk consumed daily, children were an average of 0.4 centimeters shorter.

BASED ON AN ARTICLE BY Honor Whiteman